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Literature Review: Benign Spinal Tumors: A Literature Review and Case Report

Abstract

The American Cancer Society (ACS) (2023) reports that there had been a considerable increase in benign spinal tumors among adults in the last decade. The occurrence has been precipitated by various occurrences which are focused on in the study. Specifically, in 2022, there were 24,810 diagnoses of malignant spinal cord tumors (14,280 in men and 10,530 in women). These figures were projected to be significantly higher where benign tumors were included(ACS,2023). This study focuses on Schwannoma, which is a rare sort of tumor. Schwann cells are the source of schwannoma growth. The majority of schwannoma tumors are benign, meaning they do not invade other areas of the body. However, such tumors can occasionally develop into a malignancy. That considered, this study looks at previous cases from various sources which have adequately assessed the condition. The study relies on Pubmed, NCBI, and PMC as key literature sources which are deemed instrumental to fortification of the study.

1.Introduction

A spinal tumor is an irregular growth of cells inside or around the spine. These cells appear unaffected by the processes that regulate normal cells as they expand and reproduce uncontrollably. The first case of a mobile schwannoma of the cervical spine with a disparity of two levels caudally was described in 1974 by Tomimatsu et al [1]. In 1963, Wortzman and Botterell were the first to describe a mobile cauda equina tumor [2]. This tumor was an ependymoma of the filum terminale, and it was mobile due to the laxity of the filum terminale. Benign (not cancerous) or malignant spinal tumors are possible (cancerous). The spinal cord is the site of primary malignancies, but cancer migrating to the spine from another site is referred to as metastatic cancer or a secondary tumor. A benign tumor is not malignant. The first case of a mobile schwannoma of the cervical spine with a disparity of two levels caudally was described in 1974 by Tomimatsu et al [1]. In 1963, Wortzman and Botterell were the first to describe a mobile cauda equina tumor [2]. This tumor was an ependymoma of the filum terminale, and it was mobile due to the laxity of the filum terminale. Neurofibromas, schwannomas, meningiomas, ependymomas, astrocytomas, hemangioblastomas, osteosarcomas, and osteoid osteomas are a few examples of spinal tumors that are typically benign. It is imperative to know the anatomy of the spine to establish some of the best-proposed interventions for countering a benign spinal tumor.

Numerous vertebrae, or individual spine bones, are stacked one on top to make up the spine [3]. The vertebral column is made up of this stack put together. The cervical spine refers to the neck’s uppermost vertebral column segment. The thoracic spine is the next segment, situated in the middle and upper back. (The thoracic spine’s vertebrae establish joints with the ribs or articulate with them.) The lumbar spine is located in the lower back beneath the thoracic spine. The sacral spine is situated between the hips, underneath the back’s small portion. All cervical, lung, and lumbar spine vertebrae are substantially the same. There are two portions to each vertebra. The vertebral body, or number one, is a firm, cylindric segment that resembles a marshmallow. It gives the spine strength and stability. The vertebral arch is a bone segment that forms the other segment. Bone segments, which extend from the rear of the vertebral arch, articulate with one another and serve as places of attachment for tendons, ligaments, and muscles…kindly click on the purchase icon to access the full solution at $10

 

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